Welcome to the country of meatballs: An introduction to Swedish cuisine part 1

Most people will immediately associate Sweden with IKEA and meatballs, and although meatballs with potatoes and gravy is an extremely popular dish in Sweden, the Swedish food culture is so much more than just IKEAs delicious meatballs. Here is a little insight into the Swedish cuisine – everything from sweet to salty.

  1. Swedish coffee

Our culinary journey begins with something that is very important for Swedes: coffee. A little known fact to many people is that besides Finland, Sweden is the country in the world that consume the most coffee per capita in the world, and this leads to that the Swedes being very picky with their coffee. It is generally very strong, and can be served black or with milk or sugar in it.

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  1. Princess cake

This beautiful (and extremely delicious) little piece of art is made of sponged cake, jam and cream on the inside and covered by marzipan on the outside – often also garneted with a marzipan rose on top. A princess cake is often served at birthdays but is also a common implement in the daily “fika”.

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  1. Crayfish and Swedish shrimps

The Swedes have such love for seafood that has they actually have a special party celebrating this delicacy – the crayfish party is celebrated usually in August and in addition to large quantities of crayfish and seafood being consumed, the Swedes sing a lot of drinking songs and once again show off in how good they are at drinking. Besides the tasty crayfish, the small Swedish shrimps also tend to be very popular, despite the soaring price. The Swedish shrimps are best eaten with freshly baked bread, boiled eggs and aioli – a true West Coast classic.

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  1. Sticky chocolate cake (mudcake)

The first recipe that Swedish children learn is often to bake brownies. This might be due to how easy the cake is to bake, but also on the popularity and how good it is. A sticky chocolate cake is a chocolate cake that is sticky on the inside (almost like a chocolate fondant or lava cake). The cake is served warm with fluffy whipped cream and raspberries.

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  1. Sandwich cake

A Swedish sandwich cake is in many cases a work of art. Technically, you could put anything in it, but the traditional cake has layers of shrimps, mayonnaise and dill or is garnished with meatballs or ham slices. Inside, there are layers of bread with mayonnaise or different fillings in between.

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